Street Food

Chee Cheong Fun

    What can be a snack, an appetiser and a meal all rolled into one? This simple dish of very few ingredients is quite popular and can be eaten in the morning, afternoon and evenings. The humble chee cheong fun of course! There are several styles to the preparation of chee cheong fun; some serve it in curry as a substitute for noodles, some serve it steamed with shrimps and roast pork within the rolls for a savoury meal but in… Read More »Chee Cheong Fun

    Nasi Lemak bungkus

      Nasi lemak is the quintessential Malaysian meal whether it is for breakfast, lunch, tea break, dinner or even supper. Any time is nasi lemak o’clock. Nasi lemak bungkug is full of aroma from the coconut milk rice and taste, especially those who love spicy food. There are many such stalls offering nasi lemak bungkus, you can find it at coffee shop, mamak stalls, food court and even stall by the roadside. You can wolf this down any time of the… Read More »Nasi Lemak bungkus

      “Or Chien” oyster omellete

        A chopstick-full of or chien (literally means oyster fried in Hokkien) is a chopstick-full of delicious textures and flavours. Fried oyster omelette, also known as or chien by the local is a culinary among the list of popular street foods in Penang. The oyster omelette is no ordinary omelette and in Penang, it comes in many different styles; some starchy and some crispy. Believed to be originally from Taiwan, the oyster omelette is pretty common there and over here, it… Read More »“Or Chien” oyster omellete

        Penang Assam Laksa

          It has been described as being as pungent as a clogged drain or as fragrant as a bowl of hot spicy fish soup. Penang assam laksa has being listed the 7th best food in the world by CNN travel in 2011 out of 50 food trough voting. The Penang assam laksa is one hawker dish that you either love or hate from the first sip of its sourish, spicy broth. In 2012 the episode of travel show No Reservations, Anthony… Read More »Penang Assam Laksa

          Bak Chang

            In many traditional ethnic Chinese households, every year, during the fifth day of the fifth lunar month, bak chang would be eaten to celebrate the Dragon Boat Festival. Zhong is the Cantonese name for the rice dumplings while bak chang is the Hokkien equivalent. Each type of bak chang has different ingredients according to the different cultures of the different sub-ethnic groups. The most common bak chang is the Hokkien one where the glutinous rice is fried with dark soy… Read More »Bak Chang

            Toh Soon coffee

              Back in the fifties, Ooi Toh Soon set up the small humble coffee stall in this narrow alley sandwiched between some shophouses. He started out with just simple breakfast fare of coffee, toast and half-boiled eggs. Till today, the traditional Hainan-style coffee served at the coffee stall is a favourite among locals. Today the preparation of the coffee is also done the traditional way; it is filtered, or rather slowly dripped into a tin mug, and then it is again… Read More »Toh Soon coffee

              Mee Kuah Ketam

                A serving of lip-smacking Mee Kuah Ketam will be great for seafood lover. “Kuah” refers to “gravy” in Malay and “ketam” is Crab, the direct translation would be “Noodles with Crab gravy”.  Not to be mistaken for mee ketam or even mee udang, mee kuah ketam is a special variation of mee kuah and mee goreng except that it has more oomph in its gravy. The mee kuah ketam comes either with kuah (gravy) or fried and is usually served… Read More »Mee Kuah Ketam

                Sister Curry Mee

                  A taste of the nostalgic and traditional Curry Mee in Penang is no other then the Sister Curry Mee. The octogenarians operate from a small shed in an alley in Ayer Itam, Penang, and serve customers with a smile. The sisters have continued with the business left to them by their mother and both show no signs of slowing down despite their age. More than 70 years ago, the Lim sisters came to Penang together with their mother Tan Ah… Read More »Sister Curry Mee